The humble Bunnings sausage in bread no longer looks like this, thanks to a major change prompted by safety fears.
The humble Bunnings sausage in bread no longer looks like this, thanks to a major change prompted by safety fears.

Bunnings snag change bombshell

In breaking news of national significance, the iconic Bunnings sausage sizzle has been snagged by red tape overkill.

Like safety warnings on peanut packets advising they may contain traces of nuts or hot content cautions on coffee cups, modern society's overly cautious nature has the humble warehouse chain's iconic fundraiser in its sights.

A new occupational health and safety requirement has shaken up how the quintessentially Australian delicacy of a barbecued sausage in bread is to be constructed.

Specifically, the new rule - which will apply to all stores nationally - tackles the apparent dangers posed by a few bits of fried onion.

Each Saturday and Sunday at Bunnings locations across the country, community group volunteers cook up and serve bread-wrapped snags for a few bucks each.

The proceeds provide a vital injection of funds to support their various activities, with Bunnings supplying the equipment and shade cover for the day.

Grabbing a sausage on the way in or out is an unmissable part of a trip to one of the mega warehouses. It's a tradition that has become as Aussie as thongs, meat pies and hating celebrities who achieve fame overseas.

And recently, shoppers might have noticed that the fried onion can no longer be placed on top of the sausage. It's now on the bottom.

"Safety is always our number one priority and we recently introduced a suggestion that onion be placed underneath sausages to help prevent the onion from falling out and creating a slipping hazard," Bunnings chief operating officer Debbie Poole said.

 

This pair won’t be able to get the onion on top of their snags anymore because that would be incredibly dangerous.
This pair won’t be able to get the onion on top of their snags anymore because that would be incredibly dangerous.

It's understood the guideline was quietly introduced recently but word spread this week, prompting a flurry of interest.

"This recommendation is provided to the community groups within their fundraising sausage sizzle welcome pack and is on display within the gazebos when barbecues are underway," Ms Poole said.

Melbourne radio station 3AW uncovered a rumour about the new requirement this week and confirmed its existence today, sparking a mix of amusement and annoyance from listeners.

On social media, the change has prompted mostly confusion, with one blunt user summing up the mood by tweeting: "Jesus, Mary, what the f***?"

Bunnings doesn't believe the change will have much of an impact though.

"Regardless of how you like your onion and snag, we are confident this new serving suggestion will not impact the delicious taste or great feeling you get when supporting your local community group," Ms Poole said.


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