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Test could cut cancer deaths 20%

SCREENING women for ovarian cancer regularly could reduce death rates from the disease by up to a fifth, a new medical trial has found.

Trial results were published in The Lancet medical journal on Thursday, and included research from the University of New South Wales.

The trial screened more than 200,000 British women for ovarian cancer and showed up to 20% of deaths from the cancer could be avoided by early, regular screening.

Those involved in the trial were divided into three groups. One group was given an ultrasound screening annually and blood tests, another group received only the ultrasound and the third received no tests or ultrasound.

The study showed a "mortality reduction rate" of between 15% and 28%, with deaths reduced on average by 20%.

UNSW's Professor Ian Jacobs said the results suggested early detection and screening could save lives.

He said he hoped ovarian cancer screening would become a standard test worldwide.

He is a shareholder in a screening company. The study used a test Prof Jacobs helped design.

Topics:  cancer ovarian cancer


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