FOR Roma Hospital's Nate Allen, the joy of being a midwife comes from holding new-borns like little Maggie Leahy in his arms.

Mr Allen is one of only about 100 male midwives in Queensland and the only male at Roma Hospital's maternity ward.

The 28-year-old celebrated International Day of the Midwife on Tuesday, along with the rest of his profession.

He said his career path was statistically unusual, especially when he was at university.

"I was the only man in my course at uni," he said.

"I was a nurse previously so I learnt my strengths and weaknesses through that and decided to study midwifery."

Mr Allen hails from the South Burnett area and chose the Maranoa to get an "experience that's nothing like the metropolitan areas".

"You are the first on the ground and at night we have to have those skills ready in case something goes wrong," he said.

While a male midwife is uncommon, Mr Allen said he had never been rejected by a mother at Roma Hospital because of his gender.

"I was told by a mother in Brisbane that she didn't want me as a midwife, but not out here."

Fellow midwife Amanda Corcoran, who assisted Maggie's mother Phillipa through her pregnancy, said the best thing about being a midwife was being there every step of the way.

"It's the continuity of care, because I see them for months and watching the couple's journey is the biggest thrill," she said.

A MAN AMONG MIDWIVES: Roma Hospital midwife Nate Allen is one of about 100 male midwives in Queensland. Photo Tom Gillespie / The Western Star
A MAN AMONG MIDWIVES: Roma Hospital midwife Nate Allen is one of about 100 male midwives in Queensland. Photo Tom Gillespie / The Western Star Tom Gillespie

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