HOTSPOT: Roma was ranked number one in animal collisions in Queensland and MWCEC, a group of volunteers do their bit to rehabilitate the injured animals.
HOTSPOT: Roma was ranked number one in animal collisions in Queensland and MWCEC, a group of volunteers do their bit to rehabilitate the injured animals.

Maranoa Wildlife discuss Roma's animal collision ranking

RECENT data revealed that Roma was the top animal collision hotspot in Queensland.

According to insurer AAMI, analysis of more than 21,000 AAMI animal collision claims between February 1, 2019, and January 31, 2020, revealed Roma had the highest animal related accidents across the state.

Meryl Eddie from Maranoa Wildlife Caring and Education Centre (MWCEC) said the data coming from one insurance company isn't particularly reliable as it's from only one source, however due to the drought, the results make sense.

"Roma was in a severe drought with a feed shortage everywhere at the time," she said.

"This meant more animals were coming to the roadside looking for a fresh or some sort of a pick, which in turn unfortunately means more animal collisions and more insurance claims."

MWCEC consists of a group of community volunteers who look after sick, injured and orphaned wildlife with the aim of releasing them back into their natural habitat.

The volunteer said fortunately a lot of locals and travellers don't like to see wildlife suffering.

"We find many travellers either contact us directly or drop animals to the wonderful local vets," she said.

"They assess the animal and if they think it can be rehabilitated, they contact the wildlife group for a carer to take them on.

"Our members do what they can, however most work and sometimes we just don't have anyone available to travel longer distances to pick up animals.

"Unfortunately not all animals can be saved before their injuries are too severe and they will never make it in the wild, which is also one of the harsh realities of being a wildlife carer."

Kristie Newton from WIRES, NSW Wildlife Information, Rescue and Education Service, said "As we head into winter, we may see increased activity particularly from nocturnal wildlife as they cross roads in search of food and water, which we saw after the drought, increasing the likelihood of them being hit."

Ms Edie warned people to remember that human safety was number one priority.

"Beware of the risks if handling native wildlife as most have teeth, claws and some can be poisonous," she said.

"Don't handle them if you're not confident or experienced.

"One of the biggest dangers is collecting animals from roadsides - some people are so focused on the animal that they forget about the other hazards around them, such as traffic.

"If transporting an animal, it is also important to ensure it is secured in a vehicle, like in a cage or box as you don't want it getting out distracting the driver."

The group is always needing extra financial support and would benefit from extra wildlife carers, volunteers to help with administration and social media, plus soft release sites.

If you can help please contact the Maranoa Wildlife group on 0458 624 760.


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