IN THE MONEY: Katie Young’s three children, Brayden, 7, Izayah, 6 and Sienna, 4, get $5 each if they do their jobs.
IN THE MONEY: Katie Young’s three children, Brayden, 7, Izayah, 6 and Sienna, 4, get $5 each if they do their jobs. John Mccutcheon

Survey: Aussie kids are working for their pocket money

TEWANTIN siblings Brayden, Isayah and Sienna Young are learning the value of a dollar early in life.

The youngsters - aged 7, 6 and 4 - earn $5 pocket money each a week in exchange for doing jobs around the house.

"They have to brush their teeth and make their beds, and they have to choose a job from a list every day, like emptying the dishwasher, taking out the rubbish, or sweeping the deck, to help us out," mum Katie said.

It seems the pocket money situation in the Young family is typical of most Australian households as a recent survey found most Aussie kids who received pocket money were expected to do chores to earn it.

Mrs Young said she felt it was good for children to learn to help out around the house and work for reward.

"My husband and I both work full-time. My mum lives with us. The kids have got to learn that they have got to start chipping in," she said.

"It's just learning that things don't come easy in life. We don't just walk up to an ATM every day and pull out as much money as we like. You have to work for it."

The survey found 81% of kids received $5 or less pocket money a week.

Do you think kids should get pocket money?

This poll ended on 29 May 2015.

Current Results

Yes, it teaches the kids the value of a dollar

70%

No, they shouldn't expect to get money, even for chores

23%

Pocket money?! Back in my day...

6%

This is not a scientific poll. The results reflect only the opinions of those who chose to participate.

Temika Richards, of Flaxton, has been paying her son, Elijah, 4, $20 a week for a year or so.

"I offered it to him, if he would go and make his bed, not perfectly, but pull the doona up, and pick up his toys," she said.

"He'll either save it up to spend on something the next week or he'll buy a movie. He's really into Peppa Pig stuff at the moment."

Ms Richards said Elijah occasionally asked to buy something before he had received his $20 but the advance would come out of the next pocket money payment.

But other parents on the Sunshine Coast Daily's Facebook page were divided.

"We all pitch in and share the load," Penny Perkins wrote. "Nobody should be paid to have life skills of doing chores and being thoughtful."

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